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Monday, November 30, 2009

More Views From BC

Tattoo inspiration; Vancouver Island.
Sign on Granville St. Bridge rubs it in. Vancouver, BC.
Like an ever-flowing stream.
Stream detail
Toothpicks for the Titans
Vancouver Island—land of 1,000 Kampfar album covers.
Part van, part semi—and it's for sale!
Never a problem, eh.
Canadian medieval barber dental extraction tools; still used today. Alberni Valley Museum.
Old tube tester; reminded me of PKD's novel Voices From the Street. Alberni Valley Museum.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

BC, Bud.

Canadian courtesy at perhaps its most perverse.
Shoes. Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, BC.
Hands missing, a grammarian's nightmare—but it IS boobie time!
I noticed William B. Davis, aka Cancer Man, waiting at the boarding gate at EWK. At first I thought he was George Plimpton, until I remembered Plimpton was dead. Then, he boarded my plane in executive class. The very friendly Air Canada flight attendants helped me get his autograph.

Thursday, November 12, 2009

nice nice nice nice nice.

Wednesday night's horrorcast, #21, danced more with the cosmic than the twenty Castle broadcasts that preceded it. This was no doubt due to the mystical date of Nov. 11, as well as the presence of Ghost Moth, whose live performance made me shudder—at the windows they opened—those to other worlds, other dimensions.

Then—a surprise! An extra 75 minutes of Castle broadcasting. Thrust into the trenches I was, my response: to get even more cosmic.

A failed pianist sells his soul to malevolent forces to feed his mad aspirations of success; now he's turning into a beast. The susceptibility of the transformation state (pictured above) leaves one open to the possibility of being used as a portal—say a clickable link—to the audio archive and playlist of this extra-long, extra-wide Castle broadcast. Also starring Sektor 304 and Explosive Improvised Device.

I'm off to the woods for a few weeks. My Castle of Quiet radio returns 2nd December.

(Ghost Moth's full set, clocking in at over 50 minutes, will post as an mp3 to WFMU's Beware of The Blog and Free Music Archive this coming Tuesday.)

Monday, November 9, 2009

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Do as thou wilt.

I'm easily talked into that one, SiHV. Just ask my almost-ex wife; apparently, what I "wilt" is all that I do. Then my best pal comes back from N'awlins with a human knuckle bone for me. With an inner circle like that, I may be organizing a long-table feast with my enemies. HA HA!

Yes I played Discharge. The thin membrane that was separating Discharge and Hellhammer just peeled completely away. Also starring Physical Demon, Virginal Volcanoes, Umberto, Raspberry Bulbs, Haunted George, Josh Lay, and Demons.

The lovely Florence Tanner, mental medium, is pictured above prior to her disastrous (yet oddly sensual) encounter at the Belasco House. Watery and forceful, she will gently take your hand and guide you to the playlist/streaming archive for last night's horrorcast™ (where it should be noted I played some Black-a-Billy™, in addition to the usual horrorscapes™ etc.)

What demon-spirit could possibly resist that irresponsible collar, and Ms. Tanner's milky translucence? A demon-spirit better than I.

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Screen Captures of the Day - House of the Devil (2009)

Dodgy screen caps, I'm the first to admit, but I felt the need to celebrate this winning little film (which I watched on demand rather than disc, hence my hovering, digital shaky-hand and the luminous fuzz it apprehended.)

With a clear love for early-80s mid-budget horror, House of the Devil gets high marks for blending that passion with a more modern, Haute Tension-style survival-horror method. The film pulls taut slowly, and with unexpected subtlety. The characters and cast are a wonder, with nonchalant killer AJ Bowen pretty much stealing the film (as he did with The Signal), surrounded by intense, meaningful performances from the always-unsettling Tom Noonan and the great Mary Woronov.

House of the Devil was made with obvious care by people who love old horror films (and vintage title sequences.) Though the action drags in a few spots, that's almost part of the fun, and the last 20 minutes are payoff galore!